How to Plant a Pizza Garden Ver en Español

boy watering plants

Stake out a pizza-shaped garden designed to introduce your child to plenty of fresh air and sunshine, and an early love for growing veggies. Smart, healthy, and delicious! Here's your step-by-step guide:

Sources:
"Nutrition Supervision." Bright Futures.
"Grow a Pizza Garden. Kids Growing Strong. 2015.
"Spinach Lane." USDA. June 2013.
"If They Grow It, They'll Eat It." Western Growers Foundation. 2013.
"Top Ten Tips for Gardening with Children." Urban Harvest Education.

1. Plan

Together, brainstorm types of plants that would make a good pizza. Think roma tomatoes and herbs, including basil and oregano for sauce, plus veggie toppings such as peppers and spinach. Select your favorite six.

Sources:
"Top Ten Tips for Gardening with Children." Urban Harvest Education.
"Pizza Garden – Youth Activity." Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County. 2017.
"Grow a Pizza Garden. Kids Growing Strong. 2015.
"Spinach Lane." USDA. June 2013.

2. Plot

Choose a roughly eight-foot circular patch of land that gets six to eight hours of sunlight per day. Loosen soil a foot deep, fertilize, and outline with small rocks—a great job for your little helper. Set a rock in the center, then define six equal wedges with rocks, too.

Source: "Grow a Pizza Garden. Kids Growing Strong. 2015.

3. Plant

Plant each of your chosen six vegetables in its own wedge, following seed packet instructions, or use starter plants with plenty of space between them. Tip: An old spoon makes a great child-size shovel. Let your child help make identifiers by drawing or coloring a picture of the full-grown plant on old wooden spoons, big rocks, or paper, laminated and hot-glued to wooden crafts sticks.

Sources:
"Grow a Pizza Garden. Kids Growing Strong. 2015.
"Spinach Lane." USDA. June 2013.
"Gardening with Kids Infographic." KITS. 2017.
"Milestone Moments." CDC. 2008.

4. Nurture

Regularly water and weed your pizza garden together. Use an old milk jug, partially filled and with holes poked in the cap, for a customized spill-proof kids' watering can. Talk about the changes you notice in your plants, including colors, buds, growing fruit, and height. Consider making a chart that compares plants' weekly height with your child's—some might grow to knee-height, while others get as tall as your little one!

Sources:
"Grow a Pizza Garden. Kids Growing Strong. 2015.
"Gardening with Kids Infographic." KITS. 2017.
"If They Grow It, They'll Eat It." Western Growers Foundation. 2013.

5. Harvest

When you have enough of each plant ready to harvest at once, it's time to gather. Offer safe, child-size scissors to help. Have a bucket filled with clean water ready to rinse the dirt off outside. Bring your haul inside, and get chopping. It's time to savor the fruits of your labor at your very own garden-fresh pizza party!

Sources:
"Spinach Lane." USDA. June 2013.
"Gardening with Kids Infographic." KITS. 2017.
"How Kids Can Help in the Garden." Fruits & Veggies More Matters. 2017.

Keep the fun rolling with playtime-inspired food ideas for your toddler. Try Fruit Stars and Hearts Salad as a great side dish!

This content is provided for general information purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for medical advice or a guarantee of prevention, improvement, or treatment of specific conditions. Always consult with your healthcare provider about your specific medical questions or concerns.